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Thursday, December 25, 2014

The Face at the Window (1939) - George King


Tod Slaughter is such an awesome character actor. He really puts everything he can into his pictures. I loved watching him in Sweeney Todd. This movie was no exception. George King is one of Britain's greatest story-tellers and delivers another keeper. The Face at the Window takes the Old Dark House motif and turns it on its head. 

The film takes place in 1880's France where someone has robbed the Brisson Bank in Paris. Chevalier Lucio del Gardo (Tod Slaughter) is the only one wealthy enough to help bail the bank out of trouble. Lucio del Gardo is horrible person that demands the love of the bank owners daughter. Not only is he horrible. He is a brutish creep. He stalks and harasses while seemingly getting away with it. Oh, I didn't even mention that he keeps some strange werewolf man thing as a tool in his repertoire for manipulation. 

The film is more of a melodramatic thriller than a horror movie. However, it deals with werewolves and has some pretty tame but scary scenes. Interestingly enough this movie even focuses a bit on Science Fiction. Not something I was expecting to see while watching a period drama. Though the movie didn't have your usual scary scenes. I found that del Gardo had the creepiest scenes. It was weird that he made a father instruct his daughter to proposition the Chevalier. His persistence is off putting and it matches his insanity. It may be muddled with age but the film is incredibly well balanced. 

George King is known for making something out of nothing. Though his films may be low-budget. They are creative and large. They always feel as if we are only watching a very small piece of a very grand landscape. The combination of King and Slaughter is a strike every single time. Do yourself a favor and educate yourself on this gem of the United Kingdom. It comes highly recommended. I suggest watching this movie back to back with Sweeny Todd

Director: George King
Country: United Kingdom

Did ya know...
This film is in the public domain. That means you can get a bag of popcorn and stream it below.


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