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Monday, October 19, 2015

A Nightmare on Elm Street 3: Dream Warriors (1987) - Chuck Russell



Written by Wes Craven and directed by Chuck Russel (The Blob). This incredibly dark Freddy Kruger feature happens to be one of the best of the bunch. It's definitely a step up from the original. They had gone through various re-writes of Craven's script but still came out with something that is complete and full. It really helps to strengthen the Freddy Kruger character and enrich his backstory. It's nice to actually get to see him in more than just a handful of scenes too. 






A group of young people at a mental facility start passing around stories of the famous child killer that stalks you in your dreams. Each of these young patients are at risk and seem to always be on the verge of committing suicide. When Kristen arrives with her tales of Kruger, it only strengthens the legend. Adding strength to the already powerful demon. Nancy Thompson arrives and starts coaching the kids through tactics that may help them against the dream killer. They learn about their dream powers and the differences between the dream world and the real world. With outside help from Nancy's dad, can it be enough to help them survive? 


This is an amazing entry of vintage horror from the second Golden Age, the eighties. This is almost a masterpiece. Aside from a few dragging segments and the re-edits, this movie delivers a really high-quality product. The dialogue is a bit rough, but it is more than made up for with an incredibly rich story. The effects are top-notch as well. Although this is a darker feature, Freddy starts to flush out his comedic chops as is more apparent on his future appearances. 


We a movie full of storyline and plot. Aside from the original, this film is far more focused on the underlying storyline. It's not just Freddy killing in a Christmas sweater. You get a big look the origin of Kruger, which may or may not have been retconned in later films. Then just in case you felt slighted or unimpressed with the original movie, you get closure for that as well. 

Easily the best of the Nightmare sequels to date. It has so much content, it is literally bursting at the seams. Casual viewers will really appreciate the practical special effects and characters in the Mental Facility. It may drag at points, but those points are brief and go-by quickly. The cameos are wonderful. If you haven't seen this then you will be pleasantly surprised. Freddy is terrifying and entertaining. This isn't a SFW movie either, it has an X rating. If you can find an uncut version then check it out. I bet your going to love it. Get some friends together and make a night of it. It's wonderful. Enjoy. 


Director: Chuck Russel
Country: USA

Did ya know...


Ken Sagoes stated in an interview he really didn't want to audition for the role of Kincaid, but his agent talked him into going. On the day of the audition he walked in heavy rain to catch a bus to the location. He showed up completely drenched and had to sit and wait for a few hours due to the auditions running late. When it was his turn, director Chuck Russell told him, "Do whatever you want to do". Sagoes was so frustrated and mad about the whole ordeal that he yelled "FUCK YOU!", and then proceeded to scream and curse out Russell. Russell immediately hired him.

Wes Craven had nothing to do with the first sequel, A Nightmare on Elm Street 2: Freddy's Revenge (1985), as he didn't believe that Elm Street was capable of spawning a franchise. The success of the second film, out-grossing the original, convinced him otherwise.


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